Appeal Preparation

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Important
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Preparation is the most important step. The better prepared you are the better chance you will prevail.

Items to Bring to the Appeal

PIN number

  • Usually found on your tax bill or assessment notice. Include this number on all your written documents.
  • Commonly called PINS (“Parcel Identification Numbers”) or APNS (“Assessor’s Parcel Numbers”).


Preparation is the most important step. The better prepared you are the better chance you will prevail.

Property Record Card

Carefully check your Property Record Card. You can usually find error that should be brought up to the assessor. Carefully check everything on the Property Record Card. There will most likely see a lot of abbreviations so you can ask someone in the assessors office to explain.

  • Highlight all factual or mathematical errors highlighted. Include a written description of each error.


Comparable Property Record Cards

  • Bring comparable record cards for all properties to which you are comparing your own property.


Contents

Your deed

  • This will provide legal description of the property.


Your tax bill

  • For the year at issue and several previous years.


Professional appraisal

  • Most useful if performed around the time of the assessment date. The appraisal may be able to determine the value of your property as of the date required by the Assessor.
  • May applications for home equity loans require a formal appraisal. Obtain a copy of this appraisal from your bank.


Cost Method Analysis



Sales Assessment Ratio



Sales Contract

  • Bring a copy of your sale contract only if the property was purchased recently.


Photographs

  • Bring photos of your home along with comparable properties.


Ease

  • Be prepared if you plan on presenting visual evidence, such as blowups of your analyses or photos of your property


Written summary

  • Bring a written summary of your argument. No more than one page, highlighting major points you wish to argue as well as the value at which you wish your property to be assessed.
  • Try to stick to this written argument in your verbal presentation.






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